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Baby Dill
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Keep fresh herbs in the refrigerator. If they are dirty or sandy, rinse them gently just before using them. Wrapped in a paper towel and placed in a plastic bag, herbs stay fresh for several days. Those herbs that still have their roots can be kept longer, place them in fresh water at room temperature,like cut flowers. You can also wrap the roots in a damp cloth and store the herbs in a plastic bag in the warmest part of your refrigerator.

You can freeze the herbs whole or chopped, without blanching; if you wash them, be sure to dry them thoroughly.

Storing Arugula

Arugula is highly perishable and does not keep well, even when refrigerated. Before storing it in the refrigerator, wrap a damp paper towel around the roots and place the vegetable in a perforated plastic bag; it will keep for 2 to 3 days but should be consumed as soon as possible.

Arugula can also be preserved standing up in a glass of water, like flowers; change the water daily.

Storing Baby Dill

Fresh dill can be kept for only about 2 days. Place the stems in a bowl of water, or wrap the leaves in piece of damp paper towel and store them in the refrigerator. To optimize flavor, freeze fresh dill rather than drying it.

Storing Basil

Keep fresh basil in the refrigerator. Wrap it in a slightly damp paper towel to help it stay fresh longer. Wash it just before using it. Fresh basil leaves can also be preserved in olive oil, or you can make them into a smooth paste by blending them with oil in a food processor. Store dried basil in a sealed container kept in a cool, dry, dark place.

Freezing is particularly suitable for basil, which loses much of its taste when dried. Freeze it whole or chopped;blanching is unnecessary. You can also cover it with stock or water and freeze it into cubes, which can be used in soups, sauces and stews. Use it unthawed to maximize its flavor.

Storing Chervil

Fresh chervil is delicate. Place the stems directly in water, or wrap the chervil in slightly dampened paper and store in the refrigerator. Chervil conserves its flavor better when frozen than when dried.

Storing Cilantro

Before storing it in the refrigerator, wrap a damp paper towel around the roots and place in a perforated plastic bag; it will keep for 2 to 3 days but should be consumed as soon as possible.

Storing Italian Parsley

Keep parsley in the refrigerator in a perforated plastic bag. Wash it first as it could be earthy, sandy or very damp. If it is wilted, sprinkle it lightly with water before refrigerating it; or if you have washed it , avoid drying it completely. Although parsley freezes well (with out blanching), it loses its crispness; use it unthawed. Store dried parsley in an airtight container kept in a cool, dry, dark place.

Storing Mint

Fresh mint can be kept for several days in the refrigerator. Dry mint stored in a sealed container and kept in dry, dark place, remains flavorful for up to 2 years.

Storing Rosemary

If stored properly , rosemary holds its quality for a long time after cutting.

Storing Sage

Dried sage can be kept for up to a year with little loss of flavor.

Storing Savory

Store fresh leaves in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for a few days, or chop finely and mix with water; freeze in an ice cube tray, then store in your freezer in a plastic bag.

Storing Sorrel

Sorrel is highly perishable and does not keep well, even when refrigerated. Before storing it in the refrigerator, wrap a damp paper towel around the roots and place the vegetable in a perforated plastic bag; it will keep for 2 to 3 days but should be consumed as soon as possible.
Sorrel can also be preserved standing up in a glass of water, like flowers; change the water daily.

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